Monday, April 6, 2009

CNAH Common Names Sixth Edition Published (free- see text)


NEWS RELEASE
The Center for North American Herpetology
Lawrence, Kansas
http://www.cnah.org
6 April 2009

The Center for North American Herpetology announces the April 2009 publication
of the

SIXTH EDITION of

STANDARD COMMON AND CURRENT SCIENTIFIC NAMES FOR NORTH AMERICAN
AMPHIBIANS, TURTLES, REPTILES, AND CROCODILIANS

by Joseph T. Collins & Travis W. Taggart

Color covers
Softbound
iv + 44 pages
ISBN 0-9721937-1-5
Cost: Free (see below)

The first edition of this widely-used compilation, published in 1978, listed
454 species (or
kinds) of native amphibians, turtles, reptiles, and crocodilians, and was
quickly adopted
nationwide as a source for common names for these North American (north of
Mexico)
animals, names that could be consistently used worldwide to avoid confusion,
both in
writing and speaking.

This new sixth edition lists 621 kinds of native amphibians, turtles, reptiles,
and
crocodilians in the United States and Canada, an increase of 167 species (27%)
since the
first edition in 1978 and an increase of 232 species (37%) since 1956, which
demonstrates
clearly how much the diversity of these animals in North America was previously
underestimated.

Also of interest in this sixth edition is the updated section on alien species,
those
creatures that are not native, have escaped, or have been released in North
America, and
have established breeding populations in the United State or Canada. Most
significant of
these are the large Indian Python and Boa Constrictor, which are now breeding
residents of
southern Florida. These constricting serpents reach large sizes, and can have a
serious
impact on native wildlife, as well as small livestock and neighborhood pets.

The standard common names in the fourth edition (1997) of this list were used
exclusively
in the well-known PETERSON FIELD GUIDE TO REPTILES AND AMPHIBIANS OF EASTERN
AND
CENTRAL NORTH AMERICA (third edition expanded, 1998, Houghton Mifflin Co.,
Boston),
and the standard common names in this sixth edition will be adopted for the
forthcoming
next edition of the Peterson Guide, which has the widest distribution of any
book ever
written about these creatures worldwide. Use of standardized common names
achieves
stability, comprehension, and ease of use throughout the United States and
Canada, and
thus has the potential to create closer cooperation among biologists across the
nation, so
that they may work together in the common cause of conserving and protecting
these
often-neglected creatures.

Users of the CNAH common names list are reminded that in this edition, as in
the previous
fifth edition, no space is wasted with citations for verifying or justifying
scientific name
changes or any speculative discussion based on unpublished data. The web site
of The
Center for North American Herpetology, which is the most frequently-accessed
academic
herpetological web site in the world, already contains all such citations for
changes in this
sixth edition and demonstrates once again that CNAH leads the herpetological
community
worldwide with its ability to organize and deliver in a timely and modern
(electronic and
print) fashion the scientific information so necessary to our profession. The
CNAH web
site can be accessed at

http://www.cnah.org

Single copies of this sixth edition of STANDARD COMMON AND CURRENT SCIENTIFIC
NAMES FOR NORTH AMERICAN AMPHIBIANS, TURTLES, REPTILES, AND CROCODILIANS, are
available free by simply sending a self-addressed 7 x 10 inch manila envelope
with first
class postage affixed for 4 ounces (currently $1.34; after 11 May 2009, $1.39)
to

CNAH
1502 Medinah Circle
Lawrence, Kansas 66047

For further information about this release, contact

Joseph T. Collins
(785) 393-4757
jcollins@ku.edu

or

Travis W. Taggart
(785) 650-2445
ttaggart@fhsu.edu

THE CENTER FOR NORTH AMERICAN HERPETOLOGY is a non-profit 501c3 foundation
established in 1994 and headquartered in Lawrence, Kansas.


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